The Eddie Hinton Story – Will a troubled Southern R&B genius finally get his due?

He should have been a superstar along the lines of Eric Clapton. Or John Mayer. Someone like that. As gifted as he was as a soul singer, songwriter, guitarist and producer, Hinton should have been rich and famous instead of a tragic cult hero who died broke and broken, known mostly only to hardcore Southern R&B obsessives, a man whose best recordings aren’t even in print right now.

But that’s how the hand of fate works sometimes.

After moving to Muscle Shoals, Hinton played guitar on Staple Singers, Boz Scaggs, Waylon Jennings, Mavis Staples, Toots Hibbert and Jimmy Cliff records. His playing is featured prominently on the Aretha Franklin LP “This Girl’s in Love with You.” And “3614 Jackson Highway,” the underrated covers album Cher made at Muscle Shoals Sound, bearing that Sheffield studio’s now famous address.

 

Read the full story at: http://www.al.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2018/01/eddie_hinton.html

Tab Benoit at Crescent City Blues & BBQ Festival

Down-Houma blues with Tab Benoit (Houma, LA) on the opening night of the 2016 Crescent City Blues & BBQ. Here is a clip of “Solid Simple Thing” from 2003’s The Sea Saint Sessions. Benoit has crafted an authentic gunslinging blues style over the last 30 years. He learned the ropes in Baton Rouge from blues heroes like Tabby Thomas and Henry Gray in the ’80’s.

The 3 day event in Lafayette Square Park is open to the public and put on by the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.

Fats Domino – Singer R&B Explosion 1980

Fats Domino, New Orleans R&B pianist and vocalist updating his classics in a funkier vein with live performances of “I’m Walkin'” “Blue Monday” “I’m in Love Again” “I’m Ready” and “I Want to Walk You Home” in 1980. He powered hits such as “Blueberry Hill,” “Ain’t it a Shame,” and “Walking to New Orleans.” Also known by the nickname “The Fat Man,” the best-selling African-American musician in the 1950’s had an influence on Elvis Presley, the Beatles and many ska musicians who took note of his rhythms.

Domino was born in the Crescent City in 1928. He grew up speaking French Creole before English and had learned to play piano by the age of 7. Among his stylistic influences were blues pianists Albert Ammons, Meade Lux Lewis and Little Willie Littlefield. Fats Domino’s music career took off in 1947 when Billy Diamond, a local bandleader and bassist heard him playing at a barbecue.

Domino signed onto Imperial Records and met Dave Bartholomew, who became his arranger and co-writer, in 1949. That year he and Bartholomew released the rhythm and blues cut “The Fat Man” which sold millions of copies and went gold in ’53. By the mid-50s Fats had become hugely popular with both black and white audiences. Despite his success with white listeners, Domino was still occasionally refused lodging on the basis of his race while on tour. His music releases were the most successful during his years with Imperial Records and Dave Bartholomew. After leaving New Orleans for Nashville in 1963 to transfer to ABC-Paramount, his records sales dropped off, in part due to changes in popular taste. Two years later he returned to New Orleans and reinvigorated his collaborative relationship with Bartholomew. In 1986, Fats was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but did not attend his induction ceremony. He continued to tour up until 1991, when he became concerned about his health and decided to remain in New Orleans. He even remained at his Gentilly home during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and had to be rescued from his attic as the flood waters rose in Orleans Parish. And the legend lives on!